Digital Field Trips

Can’t get here in person? No problem. If you have access to a computer with a camera, a wired high-speed internet connection, a large screen and sound, we can deliver a Digital Field Trip to you and your learners! Digital Field Trips are live, two-way, interactive virtual learning experiences. We can see and hear you, and you can see and hear us.

Digital Field Trips are inquiry based and staff led. We can adapt Digital Field Trips for different grade ranges, home learners, or for adult, senior, community-group or post-secondary audiences.

Programming Update

45 Minute Programs

  • First Peoples’ Innovations

    Program Length: 45 minutes

    Program Description: Explore a variety of Indigenous innovations and technologies practiced by First Nations' peoples of BC. While sharing and discussing, RBCM's Indigenous Learning Program Developer will highlight three to four innovations and practices of BC First Nations with the visual support of objects and images.

    Program Keywords/Vocab: First Peoples', Technology, Innovation, Dugout Canoes, Weaving, Adornment

    Target Audience: Grades 6-12

    Program Format: Depending on participants curricular needs, interests and abilities this program may be adapted or modified to suit learners and learning outcomes

    1. Introduction
    2. Pre-activity – Pair share brainstorm, shared reading
    3. Investigation:
      • Share object(s) that illustrate the sophistication, ingenuity, technique, and innovation
      • Discuss contemporary, global influence and adaptation
    4. Questions are welcomed throughout the program

    Learning Objectives:

    • Analyze the exchanges of ideas, practices, and materials involving First Nations pre-contact and post-contact
    • Describe traditional BC First Nations technologies, including the uses of plants and animals

    BC Curricular Connections: Grades 6-12 First Peoples and Social Studies, example of Content

    • Social Studies 8 – Technological innovations

    First Peoples Principles of Learning:

    • Learning is holistic, reflexive, reflective, experiential, and relational (focused on connectedness, on reciprocal relationships, and a sense of place)

    Cost: $120

    Availability: Tuesday’s – 9:00 am, 10:30 am, and 1:00 pm

  • Think Like an Archaeologist

    Program Length: 45 minutes

    Target Audience: Grades 3-7

    Program Description: Archaeologists use historical thinking and scientific methods to understand the past. This virtual, interactive learning program with a museum educator explores how archaeologists think and work in the field using images, videos and objects from the Royal BC Museum. Together we’ll explore what archaeology can teach us by practicing the inquiry, analyzing and communication skills archaeologists use when examining objects and landscapes and working with living descendent communities.

    Program Keywords/Vocab: Archaeology, Artifact, Shell Midden, Primary Source, Stratigraphy, Ancestor, Descendent, Decomposition

    Program Format:

    1. Introductions to the Royal BC Museum, the presenter, and an overview of the program.
    2. Common artifacts found in BC archaeology sites (PowerPoint Images)
    3. Examine examples of artifacts as primary sources (museum collection shared through document camera)
    4. Explore elements of an archaeology site in BC (video)
    5. Classroom activity (in a group or pairs students use archaeology thinking to complete a task)

    Learning Objectives

    • Practice observing and asking questions like an archaeologist
    • Examine objects as primary sources of evidence of the history of First Peoples
    • Appreciate the antiquity and diversity of Indigenous cultures in BC

    BC Curricular Connections: Grades 3-6 Social Studies and Science, examples of Big Ideas, Content, and Competencies

    • Social Studies 3 Big Idea – Learning about indigenous peoples nurtures multicultural awareness and respect for diversity
    • Social Studies 7 Content – Scientific, philosophical, and technological developments
    • Science 3-7 Competencies – Questioning and predicting, planning and conducting, Processing and analyzing data and information & evaluating

    First Peoples Principle of Learning:

    • Learning recognizes the role of Indigenous knowledge

    Cost: $120

    Availability: Wednesday’s – 9:00 am, 10:30 am, and 1:00 pm

30 Minute Programs

  • BC’s Gold Rush

    Program Length: 30 minutes

    Program Description: In 1858, when gold was discovered in the Fraser River, what is now known as British Columbia became a destination for hopeful miners from around the world. For every gold seeker who rushed here, there were factors that drove them from their homelands and dreams that enticed to a new and foreign place. The impacts of the gold rush on British Columbia were large, and lasting.

    Program Keywords/ Vocab: Colonialism, Immigration, Migration, Prospectors, Discrimination, Diggings, Sluice, Waterwheel

    Target Audience: Grade 4

    Program Format:

    1. The program begins with introductions to the Royal BC Museum, the presenter, and an overview of the program
    2. We will discuss the allure of gold
    3. Learn more about the people who participated in the Gold Rush of 1858
    4. See different methods and tools for finding gold
    5. Summarize how the gold rush changed the people, lands and economy of the province

    Learning Objectives:

    • Know the unique properties of gold
    • Recognize a variety of reasons why immigrants came to Canada during the gold rush
    • Understand the intended and unintended consequences of the gold rush on the development of British Columbia

    BC Curricular Connections: Grade 4 Social Studies, examples of Big Ideas

    • Social Studies 4 – The pursuit of valuable natural resources has played a key role in changing the land, people, and communities of Canada
    • Social Studies 4 – British Columbia followed a unique path in becoming a part of Canada

    First Peoples Principles of Learning

    • Learning involves recognizing the consequences of one‘s actions

    Cost: $75

    Availability: Thursday’s – 9:00 am, 10:30 am, and 1:00 pm

  • Meet the Mammoth

    Program Length: 30 minutes

    Program Description: Learn about the Ice Age and the Woolly Mammoths who lived there. Using images, video and objects we will learn about how Woolly Mammoths adapted to survive in the Ice Age. There are lots of opportunities for questions and interaction.

    Program Keywords/ Vocab: Climate, Glaciers, Tundra, Mammals, Extinct, Herbivores, Keystone Species

    Program Format:

    1. The program begins with introductions to the Royal BC Museum, the presenter, and an overview of the program
    2. Introduction to the Ice Age environment and mammals
    3. “Meet” the Woolly Mammoth
    4. Take a close up look at a piece of mammoth tusk, a cast of a mammoth molar and hair from a muskox
    5. Hypothesize about what happened to the Woolly Mammoth
    6. Review and a chance for final questions before we wrap up

    Learning Objectives:

    • List three unique features of the Woolly Mammoth that helped it to survive in the Ice Age
    • Learn about features of the Ice Age environment
    • Explore how scientists know about the way Woolly Mammoths lived and died

    BC Curricular Connections: Grades 1,3-4 Science, examples of Big Ideas

    • Science 1– Living things have features and behaviours that help them survive in their environment
    • Science 3 – Living things are diverse, can be grouped, and interact in their ecosystems; wind, water and ice change the shape of the land
    • Science 4 – All living things sense and respond to their environment

    First Peoples Principles of Learning:

    • Learning is holistic, reflexive, reflective, experiential, and relational (focused on connectedness, on reciprocal relationships, and a sense of place)

    Cost: $75

    Availability: Thursday’s – 9:00 am, 10:30 am, and 1:00 pm

  • Natural History of BC

    Program Length: 30 minutes

    Program Description: BC is vast, and the diversity of plants and animals that live in this part of the world is equally vast. This 30-minute tour of the natural history gallery at the Royal BC Museum will travel back in time to meet woolly mammoths and leap forward to examine how our landscapes will shift as a result of a changing climate. But mostly we’ll look at the weird and wild things living within our oceans, forests and even backyards.

    Program Keywords/ Vocab: Biodiversity, Habitat, Lifecycle, Teeth, Fur, Claws Native, Invasive, Paleontology, Scientists, Data, Observation

    Target Audience: Grades K-8

    Program Format:

    1. The program begins with introductions to the Royal BC Museum and an overview of the program
    2. We start the tour portion at the Paleozoic portion of the gallery, while also visiting the Woolly Mammoth
    3. Next, we explore the Climate Change area of the gallery
    4. We then head to the Forest and Seashore dioramas area and an adjoining room with specimens
    5. The tour ends at the Delta Diorama

    Learning Objectives:

    • Learn about observable features and behaviours of plants and animals
    • Explore museum specimens and gallery displays through close looking
    • Appreciate the extraordinary biodiversity within the province

    BC Curricular Connections: Grades K-8 Science, examples of Big Ideas

    • Science 2 – Living things have life cycles adapted to their environment
    • Science 7 – Evolution by natural selection provides an explanation for the diversity and survival of living things

    First Peoples Principles of Learning:

    • Learning is holistic, reflexive, reflective, experiential, and relational (focused on connectedness, on reciprocal relationships, and a sense of place)

    Cost: $75

    Availability: Thursday’s – 9:00 am, 10:30 am, and 1:00 pm

20 minute programs

  • Amazing Adaptations

    Program Length: 20 minutes

    Target Audience: Grades K-3

    Program Description: Plants and animals have features and behaviours that help them survive. Learn about some BC plants and animals and the amazing ways they survive and thrive in our local environments through this snapshot visit to the natural history gallery.

    Program Keywords/Vocab: Adaptation, Structure, Feature, Behaviour, Landform, Habitat, Ecosystem

    Program Format:

    1. Introductions to the Royal BC Museum, the presenter, and an overview of the program
    2. Visit the Delta Diorama (Fraser River Delta as landform), examine bird beak and feeding adaptations
    3. Visit the Forest Diorama (Forest as type of habitat) Practice observation skills and record or draw on worksheet
    4. Close up look at some bones, furs, models of different animal adaptations

    Learning Objectives:

    • Practice observation skills
    • Be able to describe at least three examples of adaptations
    • Demonstrate curiosity about the natural world

    BC Curricular Connections: Grades K-3 Science, examples of Content

    • Science K Content – Basic needs of plants and animals; Adaptations of local plants and animals
    • Science 1 Content – Structural features of living things in the local environment; Behavioural adaptations of animals in the local environment
    • Science 3 Content – Major local landforms (eg. mountains, riverbeds,deltas, oral narrative about landforms)

    First Peoples Principles of Learning:

    • Learning is holistic, reflexive, reflective, experiential, and relational (focused on connectedness, on reciprocal relationships, and a sense of place)

    Cost: $50

    Availability: Wednesday’s – 9:00 am, 10:30 am, and 1:00 pm

  • Diving Deep - Marine Mammals of BC

    Program Length: 20 minutes

    Target Audience: Grades K-8

    Program Description: If we dive deep into the waters off the coast of BC, we’ll find a world of sea mammals: whales, seals, sea lions, otters and dolphins. These intelligent and often social animals can tell us a lot about the ocean. In this tour, we will explore how they live, how they interact with each other, and what we can do to help keep their environment healthy. The tour will include an up-close look at the Seashore Diorama of the Natural History gallery, along with fascinating specimens to investigate as a class.

    Program Keywords/ Vocab: Oceans, Ocean Literacy, Mammals, Cetaceans, Pinnipeds, Biodiversity, Galleries, Dioramas, Specimens, Taxidermy, Form, Function, Survival

    Program Format:

    1. The program begins with introductions to the Royal BC Museum and an overview of the program
    2. The first section focuses on Cetaceans (Orcas and Humpback Whales)
    3. The second section focuses on Pinnipeds (Harbour Seals and Sea Lions)
    4. The last section focuses on Sea and River Otters

    Learning Objectives:

    • Understand the primary features of marine mammals and the importance of them to our environment
    • Compare and contrast different marine mammals and understand their unique qualities
    • Explore museum specimens and gallery displays through close looking

    BC Curricular Connections: Grades K-8 Science, examples of Big Ideas

    • Science 1 – Living things have features and behaviours that help them survive in their environment
    • Science 4 – Living things have life cycles adapted to their environment

    First Peoples Principles of Learning:

    • Learning is holistic, reflexive, reflective, experiential, and relational (focused on connectedness, on reciprocal relationships, and a sense of place)

    Cost: $50

    Availability: Thursday’s – 9:00 am, 10:30 am, and 1:00 pm

  • Home and Community

    Program Length: 20 minutes

    Program Description: British Colombia is home to people from diverse cultures, backgrounds, and perspectives. From farms to cities, people have adapted and developed communities to best fit their needs and wants.

    Program Keywords/ Vocab: Diversity, Community, Home, Needs, Wants, Resources, Environment, Immigration

    Target Audience: Grades K-2

    Program Format:

    1. The program begins with introductions to the Royal BC Museum, presenters, and an overview of the program
    2. Brainstorming our understanding of community, home, and the differences between a need (i.e. food, shelter, safety, love) and a want (i.e. toys)
    3. Explore the different ways people meet their needs/wants through objects, images, and videos

    Learning Objectives:

    • Compare the differences between needs and wants
    • Explore how the environment and people influence each other
    • Recognize and appreciate the diverse communities in BC

    BC Curricular Connections: Grades K-2 Social Studies, examples of Big Ideas:

    • Social Studies1 – We shape the local environment, and the local environment shapes who we are and how we live
    • Social Studies 2 – Canada is made up of many diverse regions and communities

    First Peoples Principles of Learning:

    • Learning ultimately supports the well-being of the self, the family, the community, the land, the spirits, and the ancestors

    Cost: $50

    Availability: Monday’s at 9:00 am, 10:30 am, and 1:00 pm

Other

  • Post-Secondary Program

    Distance programs for post-secondary classes are also available. These programs range from 45-60 minutes and cost $175. Please contact dft@royalbcmuseum.bc.ca for more details.

  • Webinar add on

    We offer a webinar version for most digital field trips. Webinar format allows for interaction with learners through a chat window, rather than through videoconferencing (with some exceptions). This makes facilitating large groups in a digital space manageable. Webinar Add-on cost is $50 in addition to the cost of the Digital Field Trip. Ask us about this option if:

    • your group is larger than 50 and joining from one location
    • participants in your group are joining from more than 40 different locations

    Webinar Add-on cost is $50 in addition to the cost of the Digital Field Trip

Book a Digital Field Trip

If you have any questions about the Digital Field Trips, please email dft@royalbcmuseum.bc.ca.

You are here