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Kwakwaka’wakw (A’wa’et?ala) Pole, 19th century

Kwakwaka’wakw (A’wa’eťala) Pole, 19th century

A photograph of this pole taken by Edward Dossetter in 1881 at the A’wa’eťala village of Dzawadi in Knight Inlet shows that it originally had five figures. Only the top three were acquired by Charles F. Newcombe in 1913. 
RBCM 1859.

 


Kwakwaka’wakw (A’wa’et?ala) Pole, 19th century Thunderbird or Kolus, a supernatural bird related to the Thunderbird. The wings are replacements. Photographs taken by Edward Dossetter in 1881 at Dzawadi show that the original wings sloped downward. (Downward sloping wings are a characteristic of the Kolus.)
Dzunukwa, the Wild Woman of the Woods, a sleepy giantess who desires to capture children and eat them. Her pursed lips refer to her habitual cry: ‘Hu, Hu, Hu.’ Dzunukwa is also known as Property Woman. Encountering her may bring wealth and supernatural power.  

Chief holding a Copper. Coppers, distinctively shaped plaques made of copper, are symbols of chiefly wealth and prestige. Each has a specific name and value that can be increased through potlatching.


Kwakwaka’wakw (A’wa’et?ala) Pole in situDzawadi, 1881. Edward Dossetter photograph. BC Archives B-03564.

Kwakwaka’wakw (A’wa’et?ala) Pole in Thunder Bird ParkThunderbird Park. Trio Crocker photograph. RBCM PN 11690.

Kwakwaka’wakw (A’wa’et?ala) PoleThunderbird Park. Trio Crocker photograph. RBCM PN 11690.
Kwakwaka’wakw (A’wa’et?ala) Pole in Thunder Bird ParlThunderbird Park. T. W. S. Parsons photograph. RBCM PN 6021.

Kwakwaka’wakw (A’wa’et?ala) Pole in Thunderbird ParkThunderbird Park, 1952.
BC Government photograph.
BC Archives I-26798.

Kwakwaka’wakw (A’wa’et?ala) Pole in Thunderbird ParkThunderbird Park.
T.W.S. Parsons photograph.
RBCM PN 6021.



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