Image Credit: Melanie Grisak

BC's Living Landscapes

Living Landscapes was created by the Royal British Columbia Museum as a regional outreach program involving intensive cooperation with other museums, First Nations, educators, naturalists, and other agencies. Our goal is to encourage and facilitate the exploration and appreciation of the human and natural history of British Columbia from regional perspectives.

We approach this goal through focus on particular regions of B.C. and integrating stories and research locally generated with both research knowledge and descriptive information from the collections and curatorial staff at the Royal British Columbia Museum.

Living Landscapes' initial focus for in-field programming has been the northern, central and southern interior of British Columbia. With the successful completion of the Northwest region in March 2006, we have achieved our goal of facilitating the exploration and appreciation of the human and natural history of the northern, central and southern interior of the province. Our in-field programming has been discontinued.

If you have a research or educational project that provides new regional views into the human and natural history of BC, we would be pleased to hear from you. Please contact us at: Living Landscapes 

Northwest

Great Glacier
Photo: Gordon Weary, 2002

The Northwest region of the Royal BC Museum's Living Landscapes program encompasses the spectacular and rugged mountains and coast extending from Queen Charlotte Sound and Haida Gwaii (Queen Charlotte Islands) in the south and west to the Yukon border between the Alaska boundary and the Cassiar Mountains.

A range of research projects providing a brief glimpse into some of the diverse human and natural history of the region has been compiled under the general themes of Natural History and Human History. This has been made possible through the generous support of, Western Economic Diversification Canada, and our regional program partners.

Entering Kitlope Lake at Dusk
Photo: Sheree Ronaasen, 2004

One of the most exciting outcomes of the Living Landscapes programme is the catalytic effect that it had on regional participants which include a broad cross-section of people with different vocations, avocations and community affiliations. We continue to be interested in hearing about research and educational initiatives that reflect local perspectives on the human and natural history of the Northwest region.

Peace River - Northern Rockies

The Royal British Columbia Museum is currently focusing on the fourth phase of its province-wide Living Landscapes program in the Peace River - Northern Rockies region. Working in cooperation with local research partners and the assistance of a Regional Advisory Panel, we look forward to exploring a wide range of topics over a three-year period, from January 2003 through December 2005.

Peace River near Farrell Creek, 2002.
Photo: Brian Churchill.

Our primary vision for this initiative, developed through a regional workshop, is to: provide a learning window on the northeast; raise awareness of its human and natural diversity and emphasize the importance of our northern heritage to the province as a whole; and to foster local pride and appreciation, particularly among the young.

The Peace River - Northern Rockies region encompasses the vast area of the northeast extending from the Yukon and Alberta borders to the eastern slopes of the Rocky Mountains in the south, and Cassiar Mountains in the north.

Overviews for research projects underway can be found under the general headings of Natural History and Human History. When projects are completed, summary reports will be added to this site.

Zoo Valley, Muskwa Ranges, 1996.
Photo: Brian Churchill.

One of the most exciting outcomes of the Living Landscapes program is the catalytic effect that it had on regional participants which include a broad cross-section of people with different vocations, avocations and community affiliations. We extend our thanks and appreciation to the our regional supporters throughout the Peace River-Northern Rockies; and we continue to be interested in hearing about research and educational initiatives that reflect local perspectives on the human and natural history of the Peace River-Northern Rockies region.

Upper Fraser Basin

The Royal British Columbia Museum turned the focus of its Living Landscapes program to the Upper Fraser Basin in 2000. This region covers a vast area extending across most of south-central British Columbia including the Fraser River valley upstream from Big Bar Creek, as well as it is tributary drainages such as the Chilcotin, Quesnel, and Nechako Rivers.

Junction of Fraser and Chilcotin Rivers,1998.
Photo: Robert Cannings.

Projects pertaining to this region have been compiled under the general themes of Natural History and Human History. Also, during the launch period, the Royal BC Museum worked in collaboration with local museums in 5 communities throughout the region to bring the Living Landscapes experience directly to school students and the general public through a series of Special Events.

Above Moose Pass, Mount Robson Park, 1973.
Photo: Robert Cannings.

One of the most exciting outcomes of the Living Landscapes program is the catalytic effect that it had on regional participants which include a broad cross-section of people with different vocations, avocations and community affiliations. We extend our thanks and appreciation to the our regional supporters throughout the Upper Fraser Basin; and we continue to be interested in hearing about research and educational initiatives that reflect local perspectives on the human and natural history of the Upper Fraser Basin region.

Thompson Okanagan

The Royal BC Museum launched its regional outreach program Living Landscapes in October 1994 with a focus on the Thompson - Okanagan region of south-central British Columbia.

Osoyoos Lake, South Okanagan
Photo: Rob Cannings

Titled, Living Landscapes...Thompson-Okanagan: Past, Present, & Future, the purpose of the initiative was to work with community organizations, educators, First Nations, naturalists, historical societies, museums and others in encourage the exploration of their local cultural and physical environments.

Through this initiative the Royal BC Museum partnered with Okanagan University College to develop on-line public access to project results through the Internet. The initial Living Landscapes/Thompson-Okanagan regional website was launched in 1996 and was jointly maintained until April 2002.

To maintain access to many of the original components of the earlier Thompson-Okanagan Living Landscapes regional website, they have been reformatted and presented here under the categories of Human History and Natural History

Douglas Lake Ranch, Nicola
Photo: Brent Cooke

One of the most exciting outcomes of the Living Landscapes program is the catalytic effect that it had on regional participants which include a broad cross-section of people with different vocations, avocations and community affiliations. We extend our thanks and appreciation to the our regional supporters throughout the Thompson-Okanagan; and we continue to be interested in hearing about research and educational initiatives that reflect local perspectives on the human and natural history of the Thompson-Okanagan region.

Columbia Basin

The Columbia Basin of southeastern British Columbia encompasses the drainages that feed the Columbia River system including the Kootenay River in the east and the Kettle Valley in the west. In1997 the Royal BC Museum in partnership with the Columbia Basin Trust, co-sponsored more than 30 research and public education activities to launch the program across the region.

Upper Columbia River, 1998. 
Photo: Robert Cannings

Projects supported by Living Landscapes: Columbia Basin have been compiled here under the categories of Natural History and Human History. Projects of specific interest to teachers are grouped under the category of Education.

Access to all these projects assists the Royal British Columbia Museum and the Columbia Basin Trust in achieving their respective missions.

The Royal BC Museum has a mission to explore and preserve British Columbia's Natural History and Human History, to inspire curiosity and wonder, and to share our story with the world.

The Columbia Basin Trust is a regional corporation created in 1995 to work with residents of the Columbia Basin to promote social, economic and environmental well-being in the region most affected by the Columbia River Treaty.

Columbia Lake, 2000.
Photo: Robert Cannings.

One of the most exciting outcomes of the Living Landscapes program is the catalytic effect that it had on regional participants which include a broad cross-section of people with different vocations, avocations and community affiliations. We extend our thanks and appreciation to the our regional supporters throughout the Columbia Basin; and we continue to be interested in hearing about research and educational initiatives that reflect local perspectives on the human and natural history of the Columbia Basin region.

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